Triglycerides

Triglycerides are a type of fat found in the blood and are measured at the same time as blood cholesterol.

What are Triglycerides?

Triglycerides are a type of fat found in the blood and are measured at the same time as blood cholesterol. Triglycerides which are absorbed from the foods we eat such as meats, dairy products and cooking oils are transported to tissues for energy or are stored as fat.

When a person eats, the carbohydrates which are not immediately used for energy are converted into triglycerides that are stored and used for energy later. Most triglyceride formation occurs in the liver but a small amount also occurs in the fat cells.

Having a high triglyceride level increase your risk of heart disease and stroke and are also a sign of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Raised triglyceride levels can be the first sign of Type 2 diabetes, apparent even before raised blood glucose levels are detected.  A low level HDL level often goes hand in hand with a high triglyceride level.

Triglyceride Ranges:

  • Normal – Less than 1.7 mmol/L
  • Borderline High – Between 1.8 and 2.2 mmol/L
  • High – Between 2.3 and 5.6 mmol/L
  • Very High – 5.7 mmol/L and above